Crawling through middle Prehistory

For late mid Pleistocene prehistory, I am short on notes for developments in Africa, Asia, and Europe. It is believed that modern humans migrated from Africa and began to populate the world, but the references I have gathered don’t describe this process well.

The next period, the 5th decamillennium BP, also belongs to late Pleistocene prehistory, but I have placed in middle prehistory. Decamillennium is too a word. I made it up myself, from perfectly respectable roots; it’s less cumbersome to write ‘the 5th decamillennium BP’ than it is ‘the period from 50,000 years before present to 40,000 years before present’ over and over. I don’t yet have many references to events of this period.

The next period, the 4th decamillennium BP, also belongs to the late Pleistocene prehistory. It is thought that Neanderthal man began to disappear in this period, and were replaced by modern humans. The maximum extent of the last ice age is thought to have been approximately in this period.

For Anthropology, I have finished making connections to nations as far as they have developed and will begin making connections to cities smaller than Singapore. For Personal studies, I have finished making connections to cities larger than Hong Kong, and have begin connecting to nations. For Science, I have finished reviewing the connections to Anthropology. I am beginning to connect biographies. This is somewhat out of order according to my current development scheme, but it fits with what the scheme should have been.

More Early Prehistory

Sometimes I find that including more references and information creates more confusion.
For the period I am calling mid Pleistocene prehistory, in Africa I am finding references to anatomically modern man. The middle East has a few unspecified references to tools, and to some Neanderthals. South Asia has a references to Soanian culture, which is identified more with stones than bones. The Orient and Southeast Asian and Oceanic peoples have references to Homo erectus in the early period. Europe chiefly has references to Neanderthals. Eventually, I will have to broaden the connections to include more nations, subdivide the period, and find better references to clarify developments of this period. In the meantime, stone age developments and hunting and gathering peoples are chiefly applicable. There are traces of the origins of social institutions, but I consider them more speculative than substantial, and I lack good references. Pretty much the same goes for culture.

Back to the Beginning

I abruptly decided that I was tired of the 19th century, and to go back to prehistory.

Pliocene prehistory is focused on the earliest origins of humanity, as revealed by investigation of skeletal remains by archaeologists, primarily of the 20th century. These are limited to Africa, which is still being connected. Stone age developments are also being considered. The origins of the institutions ought to be traced, but the evidence is still unclear. Most of the evidence consists of stone tools and skeletal remains, or what I call “stones and bones”.

Early Pleistocene prehistory likewise is limited to principally the 19th century, and mostly limited to Africa. along with stone age developments and institutional origins. The evidence is still mostly stones and bones.

Early mid Pleistocene prehistory. This began to be studied in the 19th century, and is better known in the 20th century. Remains of are found in Africa, Asia, and Europe. This is still mostly concerned with stone age developments and hunting and gathering society. The role of institutions is not yet clear. Evidence is still mostly stones and bones. I have not yet examined culture enough to distinguish the various types of stone industries, but this important in the archaeology of this period. The predominant species of this period is believed to be homo erectus.

For Western Civilization, I have made connections to human geography as far as it has been developed.
The history of institutions through middle prehistory has been rewritten. Science has also been connected to details of human geography as far as they are developed.

Slow progress

One of the reasons my review of history is going so slowly is that I am taking the time to expand the links of other connected areas.

Although my review of the mid 19th century from 1841-1860 is principally showing up Britain’s involvement in the Crimean war and the United States in the Mexican war, there are still a lot of international developments I have set aside for now.

In the major area of culture, specifically the sociology of culture, I have completed the connection with cities and I will be doing a review of how various peoples of the world are connected to culture.

18th century Anglic history

In the late 18th century from 1781 to 1800, the British recognized American independence, expanded the East India Company holdings in India and began settlement of Australia. The United States established an improved system of government under its Constitution. The French Revolution was important in Europe.

In the early 19th century from 1801-1820, George III was deemed unfit to rule and his son reigned as regent in his stead in the period known as the Regency. Britain was involved in the Napoleonic wars. In the United States, the presidencies of Jefferson, Madison, and Monroe can be connected. The War of 1812 occurred. The New York city street grid was expanded to cover all of Manhattan island. An attempted invasion of Canada by the United States in the war of 1812 was defeated.

In the early mid 19th century from 1821-1840 in the United Kingdom, George IV and William IV ruled, slavery was abolished, there was electoral reform in 1832, and Victoria ascended to the throne in 1837. In the United States, the presidencies of Monroe, John Quincy Adams, Jackson, and Van Buren can be connected. New York City became connected to the agricultural region of the United States with completion of the Erie Canal. The British governed Canada and united the various provinces into a single domain in 1840.

Revolution

Specifically, the late mid 18th century from 1761-1780 has most of the American Revolution. While losing most of the American colonies, the British consolidated their rule over Canada and expanded their dominions in India.

I have finished a rewrite of the middle prehistory of institutions. I still don’t have the specific detail I would like, but it will come eventually.

Personal studies have gone through a rewrite of their connections to science. The next stage is to further connect personal studies to Sociology. The remaining medium and smaller countries and cities will be better connected to biographies and to contributions in psychology and the human body.

More history

For the early mid 18th century, from 1721-1740, I have a particular interest in British history, which includes the reign of George I. In North America, this included King George’s War, the third of the French and Indian wars. There were other things going on in Europe which had an influence on the Americas, which I will probably discuss more on the next pass through the 18th century.

For the mid 18th century from 1741-1960, I have an interest in British history, which included the reign of George II. The Seven years war with France began. In North America, this was the fourth of the series of the French and Indian Wars. Other European developments also affected the Americas.

When you’re Hot

I normally do at most one post per day, but when you’re hot, you’re hot. (Or, perhaps, when you live in Phoenix, you’re hot…) British peoples were unified as the United Kingdom under Queen Anne. In North America, the second of the French and Indian Wars, Queen Anne’s War, between French and British colonists took place. The War of the Spanish Succession was another event in early 18th century Europe.

I have rewritten the early prehistory of Institutions; not that I really have more information about it, but because there are more connections to be considered. This was an area of much speculation based on insufficient data in the early part of this century, and although more evidence has been uncovered, it appears that there is still more speculation than established fact.

Back in the Saddle

I have had some health problems in the past week, which have delayed my creation of posts for this blog. I expect to pick up the pace

Picking up where I left off in the summary of history, for the late mid 17th century, I have given a little more attention to the British and to the restoration of the British monarchy under Charles II. There was also development of the the British colonies in North America, especially the British takeover of New Amsterdam, which was renamed New York. The British had an increasing presence in India.

For the late 17th century, I also have more attention to the British and the next generation of the British monarchy under William and Mary, continued development of the British colonies in North America and the beginnings of the French and Indian wars between English an French colonists in North America, and an increasing British presence in India.

For my studies in logic, I have been attempting to review Aristotle’s “On Interpretation”, and it’s not exactly easy to digest. In topic or section 1, he begins by attempting to define his terms, “noun” and “verb”, “denial” and “Affirmation”, and “Proposition and sentence”. I’m not inclined to give excessive weight to Aristotle’s authority: It’s a good beginning approach, but the discussion has, or should have, moved beyond him by now. I do note that with the development of mathematical and symbolic logic, his discussion seems more heavily linguistic than I am prepared to discuss. There will be more on this later.

Scattered Progress

It seems that I am going to have to upgrade my web development tools. I have been satisfied with HoTMetaL Pro, which I have been using for years, but the site has expanded beyond its ability to track the link structure, so I am switching to a new editor. I may have to learn CSS, which I have been resisting doing as well, but if that helps me improve the site’s appearance, so much the better.

I have cycled my studies of history around to the early 17th century. There is some coverage of the early settlement of North America, but most of the action is centered in Europe.
For the early mid 17th century, there is more settlement of North America and some coverage of England and Europe.
For mid 17th century, I have reference to the English Civil War, and still more settlement of North America including Canada.

I prefer to announce what I have finished, rather than what I am working on. Personal studies are now connected to details of anthropology, and Science is now connected to details of culture, which is an important advance.