Modern History of Western Civilization

Modern history including the 16th century, 17th century, 18th century, 19th century, and 20th century can be used to examine Western Civilizaation.

Western peoples began to expand worldwide.

   

Modern History

Modern history can be used to examine Anglic peoples including British, Anglo-American, and Anglo-Australian peoples peoples; Latin peoples including Italian, French, Hispanic, and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples including those of Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Austria; Northeast European peoples including East Slavic peoples, West Slavic peoples, Hungarian peoples, and Baltic peoples; Balkan peoples including East Romance, Greek, South Slavic, and Albanian peoples; and Scandinavian peoples including those of Sweden, Denmark, and Finland.

The 16th century

The 16th century including the early 16th century, early mid 16th century, mid 16th century, late mid 16th century, and late 16th century can be used to examine Latin peoples including Italian, Hispanic, French, and Lusitanic peoples. Latin peoples came to dominate the Americas and had some influence in Africa and Southeast Asia. It can also be used to examine Anglic peoples including British and Anglo-American peoples; Germanic peoples including Germany, the Netherlands and Belgium; Northeast European peoples including East Slavic, West Slavic, and Hungarian peoples; Balkan peoples including East Romance peoples, and Scandinavian peoples. This was the early period of Western exploration and discovery, with the beginnings of conquest and colonization.

The early 16th century including the early 1500s, late 1500s, early 1510s, and late 1510s can be used to examine Anglic including Ango-American peoples; Latin peoples including Hispanic and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples, and Northeast European peoples. The early mid 16th century including the early 1530s, early mid 1520s, early 1530s, and late 1530s can be used to examine Anglic including Ango-American peoples; Latin peoples including Hispanic and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples, and Northeast European peoples. The mid 16th century including the early 1540s, late 1540s, early 1550s, and late 1550s can be used to examine Anglic including Ango-American peoples; Latin peoples including Hispanic and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples, and Northeast European peoples. The late mid 16th century including the early 1560s, late 1560s, early 1570s, and late 1570s can be used to examine Anglic including Ango-American peoples; Latin peoples including Hispanic and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples, and Northeast European peoples. The late 16th century including the early 1580s, late 1580s, early 1590s, and late 1590s can be used to examine Anglic including Ango-American peoples; Latin peoples including Hispanic and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples, and Northeast European peoples.

17th century

The 17th century including the early 17th century, early mid 17th century, mid 17th century, late mid 17th century, and late 17th century can be used to examine Latin peoples including Italian, French, Hispanic, and Lusitanic peoples; Anglic peoples including British and Anglo-American peoples; Germanic peoples including Germany, the Netherlands, and Belgium; Northeast European peoples including East Slavic, West Slavic, and Hungarian peoples; Balkan peoples including East Romance peoples; and Scandinavian peoples. The period of exploration and discovery continued, with conquest and colonization continuing.

The early 17th century including the early 1600s, late 1600s, early 1610s, and late 1610s can be used to examine Anglic peoples including Anglo-American peoples; Latin peoples incluing Hispanic and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples, and Northeast European peoples. The early mid 17th century including the early 1620s, late 1620s, early 1630s, and late 1630s can be used to examine Anglic peoples including Anglo-American peoples, Latin peoples including Hispanic and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples; and Northeast European peoples. The mid 17th century including the early 1640s, late 1640s, early 1650s, and late 1650s can be used to examine Anglic including Anglo-American peoples; Latin peoples including Hispanic and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples, and Northeast European peoples. The late mid 17th century including the early 1660s, late 1660s, early 1670s, and late 1670s can be used to examine Anglic peoples including Anglo-American peoples; Latin peoples including Hispanic and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples; and Northeast European peoples. The late 17th century including the early 1680s, late 1680s, early 1690s, and late 1690s can be used to examine Anglic including Anglo-American peoples; Latin peoples including Hispanic, Lusitanic, and French peoples; Germanic peoples, and Northeast European peoples.

18th century

The 18th century including the early 18th century, early mid 18th century, mid 18th century, late mid 18th century, and late 18th century can be used to examine Anglic peoples including British and Anglo-American peoples; Latin peoples including Italian, French, Hispanic, and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples including those of Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Austria; Northeast European peoples including East Slavic, West Slavic, and Hungarian peoples; Balkan peoples including East Romance peoples; and Scandinavian peoples. The world had been largely explored, but colonization and conquest continued. Conflicts between Anglic and French empires resulted in Anglic predominance.

Early 18th century

The early 18th century including the early 1700s, late 1700s. early 1710s, and late 1710s can be used to examine Anglic including Anglo-American peoples; Latin peoples including Italian, French, Hispanic, and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples, and Northeast European peoples.

Early mid 18th century

The early mid 18th century including the early 1720s, late 1729s, early 1730s, and late 1730s can be used to examine Anglic including Anglo-American peoples; Latin peoples including Italian, French, Hispanic, and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples; and Northeast European peoples.

Mid 18th century

The mid 18th century including the early 1740s, late 1740s, early 1750s, and late 1750s can be used to examine Anglic including Anglo-American peoples; Latin peoples including Italian, French, Hispanic, and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples; and Northeast European peoples.

Late mid 18th century

The late mid 18th century including the early 1760s, late 1760s, early 1770s, and late 1770s can be used to examine Anglic peoples including Anglo-American peoples; Latin peoples including Italian, French, Hispanic, and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples; and Northeast European peoples.

Late 18th century

The late 18th century including the early 1780s, late 1780s, early 1790s, and late 1790s can be used to examine Anglic peoples including Anglo-American peoples; Latin including Italian, French, Hispanic, and Lusitanic peoples, Germanic, peoples, and Northeast European including East Slavic peoples.

19th century

The 19th century including the early 19th century, early mid 19th century, mid 19th century, late mid 19th century, and late 19th century can be used to examine Anglic peoples including British and Anglo-American peoples. The British empire was the predominant world power, and Anglo-American peoples expanded substantially. Latin peoples including Italian, French, Hispanic, and Lusitanic peoples began to lose political power as Latin America gained independence. Germanic peoples including those of Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Austria became important. Germany began to unify, while Austria led the Austrian-Hungarian empire. Northeast European peoples including East Slavic, West Slavic, and Hungarian peoples can be examined. Balkan peoples including East Romance, Greek, and South Slavin peoples can be examined. Scandinavian peoples including those of Sweden can be examined. European colonization and conquest continued, and the Industrial revolution began to transform Western Civilization.

Early 19th century

The early 19th century including the early 1800s, late 1800s, early 1810s, and late 1810s can be used to examine Anglic including Anglo-American peoples; Latin including Italian, French, Hispanic, and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples, and Northeast European peoples including East Slavic peoples. Anglic peoples continued to expand, and the Latin American peoples began to declare independence from Spain.

Early mid 19th century

The early mid 19th century including the early 1820s, late 1820s, early 1830s, and late 1830s can used to examine Anglic including Anglo-American peoples; Latin including Italian, French, Hispanic and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples; and Northeast European including East Slavic peoples. Anglic peoples continued to expand and industrialize, and Latin America gained its independence.

Mid 19th century

The mid 19th century including the early 1840s, late 1840s, early 1850s, and late 1850s can be used to examine Anglic including Anglo-American and British peoples; Latin including Italian, French, Hispanic, and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic; and Northeast European peoples including East Slavic peoples can be connected. Anglic peoples continued to industrialize.

Late mid 19th century

The late mid 19th century including the early 1860s, late 1860s, early 1870s, and late 1870s can be used to examine Anglic including Anglo-American and British peoples; Latin including Italian, French, Hispanic, and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples; and Northeast European peoples including East Slavic peoples. The US Civil war was in this period.

Late 19th century

The late 19th century including the early 1880s, and late 1880s can be used to examine Anglic including British and Anglo-American peoples. Anglic peoples continued to industrialize. It can also be used to examine Latin including Italian, French, Hispanic, and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples, and Northeast European peoples including East Slavic peoples. The late 1880s including 1886, 1887, 1888, 1889, and 1890 can be connected. The early 1890s including 1891, 1892, 1893, 1894, and 1895 can be connected. The late 1980s including 1896, 1897, 1898, 1899, and 1900 can be connected.

20th century

The 20th century including the early 20th century, early mid 20th century, mid 20th century, late mid 20th century, late 20th century, and early 21st century including the early 2000s, late 2000s, early 2010s, and late 2010s can be used to examine Anglic peoples including Anglo-American, British, and Anglo-Australian peoples; Latin peoples including Italian, French, Hispanic, and Lusitanic peoples; Germanic peoples including those of Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium and Austria; Northeast European peoples including East Slavic, West Slavic, Hungarian, and Baltic peoples; Balkan peoples including East Romance, Greek, South Slavic, and Albianian peoples; and Scandinavian peoples including those of Sweden, Denmark, and Finland. The Western colonization and conquest of the rest of the world reached its maximum extent, and then began to reverse, as a process of decolonization began.

History, sociology, institutions, culture, anthropology, personal studies, and science will be connected as the site develops.

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Created 17 Mar 2014 Last updated 26 Dec 2017